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Course Planning » UHS Course Planning Guide 2021-2022

UHS Course Planning Guide 2021-2022

UHS Course Planning Guide 2021-2022

 

 

GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION

PURPOSE

The purpose of this guide is to serve as a resource for both students and parents regarding courses offered at Ukiah High School.  This should not replace a student meeting with their counselor to design a program tailored to the individual needs of each student.

NEW 8 PERIOD DAY BELL SCHEDULE FOR 2021-2022 SCHOOL YEAR AND BEYOND

Ukiah High School will be adopting a new permanent schedule beginning with the 2021-22 school year.  It is known as an 8 Period A/B Block Schedule.  This schedule offers eight classes over the course of the full year.  There are 4 classes each day.  There are A and B days.  The many benefits of the schedule for students include:

  • Increased access to the courses and programs.
  • Increased academic support within the school day.
  • Program and support access equal to other high schools.
  • Block periods to foster hands-on, engaged student learning.
  • Time for students to complete work during the school day.
  • Students can complete multiple goals beyond graduation requirements.

UHS GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The Ukiah Unified District Board of Education approved the following requirements for graduation:


ALL STUDENTS must successfully complete a minimum of 230 credits, not more than 40 of which may be physical education.  All required courses must be taken at Ukiah High School.   Students receive 10 credits for every yearlong course completed, unless it is an hours-based course.

Graduation requirements include:

  1. Four years of English
  2. Three years of Social Studies including:
  3. One year of World History or AP European History
  4. One year of U.S. History or AP U.S. History
  5. One year of American Institutions or AP Comparative Government
  6. Two years of Mathematics, including one year of Algebra.
  7. Two years of Science: one biological (life), one physical or two years of agriculture or one of each
  8. Two years of Physical Education.
  9. One year of visual or performing arts OR one year of foreign language OR one year of career technical education.
  10. Nine Elective courses

*Graduation requirements for the Class of 2022 will remain the same on an 8 period day.  Beyond the Class of 2022 will be reviewed in the 2021-2022 school year.


A-G REQUIREMENTS (CSU AND UC SYSTEM)

A grade of “C” or better is required for all A-G classes being taken for college entrance.  For the Spring of 2020 (Due to Covid) a grade of “P” is acceptable.  To request a grade of “P” for the Spring of 2020 please have your parent email your counselor.  For a complete list of UHS A-G Classes click here: Ukiahi A-G Course List 2021-2022

(A) History/Social Science – 2 years required.  Two years of history/social science, including one year of U.S. History or one-half year of U.S. History and one-half year of civics or American Government; and one year of world history, cultures and geography.

(B) English – 4 years required.  Four years of college preparatory English that includes frequent and regular writing, and reading of classic and modern literature.  Not more than two semesters of ninth grade English can be used to meet this requirement.

(C) Mathematics – 3 years required, 4 years recommended.  Three years of college preparatory mathematics that includes the topics covered in elementary and advanced algebra and two and three dimensional geometry.  Approved integrated math courses may be used to fulfill part or this entire requirement, as many math courses taken in the seventh and eighth grades that your high school accepts as equivalent to its own math courses.

(D) Laboratory Science – two years required, three years recommended.  Two years of laboratory science providing fundamental knowledge in at least two of these three disciplines:  biology (which includes anatomy, physiology, marine biology, aquatic biology, etc.), chemistry and physics.  Laboratory courses in earth/space sciences are acceptable if they have as prerequisites or provide basic knowledge in biology, chemistry or physics.  The appropriate two years of an approved integrated science program may be used to fulfill this requirement.  Not more than one year of ninth grade laboratory science can be used to meet this requirement.

(E) Language Other than English – two years required, three years recommended.  Two years of the same language other than English.  Courses should emphasize speaking and understanding, and include instruction in grammar, vocabulary, reading and composition.  Courses in language other than English taken in the seventh and eighth grade may be used to fulfill part of this requirement if your high school accepts them as equivalent in its own courses.

(F) Visual and Performing Arts – one year required.  One unit (one year or two semesters) of coursework in visual and performing arts (dance, drama/theater, music or visual arts)

(G) College Preparatory Electives – one year required.  One year (two semesters), in addition to those required in “a-g” above, chosen from the following areas:  visual and performing arts, history, social science, English, advanced mathematics, laboratory science and language other than English (a third year in the language used for the “e” requirement or two years of another language).

For UC admissions, 11 A-G courses must be completed prior to the 12th grade/last year of high school/secondary school. No particular course pattern is required for this review. 


COLLEGE ENTRANCE  INFORMATION

CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY COLLEGES

California Community Colleges are schools such as Mendocino College, Santa Rosa Junior College and College of the Redwoods.  All high school graduates are eligible for admission.  There are no specific high school courses or grade point averages required for entrance, but a lack of prerequisites may prevent enrollment for the desired college courses.


CSU AND UC EXAM REQUIREMENTS (IN ADDITION TO COMPLETING A-G)

UC will not consider SAT or ACT test scores when making admissions decisions or awarding Regents and Chancellor’s scholarships. If students choose to submit test scores as part of their application, they may be used to determine eligibility for the California statewide admissions guarantee, as an alternative method of fulfilling minimum requirements for eligibility or for course placement after they enroll.


The California State University (CSU) will continue to temporarily suspend the use of ACT/SAT examinations in determining admission eligibility for all CSU campuses for the 2022-2023 academic year. This temporary change of admission eligibility applies for the following terms: Fall 2021, Winter 2022, Spring 2022, Fall 2022, Winter 2023 and Spring 2023 admission cycles. 


*Registration materials for SAT Reasoning Test, ACT, and SAT Subject Tests are available in the counseling office.  The school testing code number is 053580.


NCAA REQUIREMENTS

Students who are considering athletics at a Division I or II college after high school need to register with the NCAA Initial Eligibility Center at web1.ncaa.org/eligibility center.  Please see your counselor for more information.



GRADUATION WITH HIGH ACHIEVEMENT AND

HIGHEST ACHIEVEMENT

All Ukiah High School students should graduate having successfully completed either the A-G college entrance requirements or a CTE Pathway.  Students who complete above and beyond A-G or CTE Pathway completion will be recognized with High Achievement or Highest Achievement in our UHS Graduation Program for the Class of 2022 and beyond. This should be strongly considered when selecting your classes.

Click here for more details: UHS Graduation with Achievement 


ACHIEVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMPLETE COLLEGE CLASSES

There are three ways to complete college classes while  attending Ukiah High School.  Concurrent Enrollment, Dual Enrollment or applying to be a part of Middle College. 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT @ MENDOCINO COLLEGE

UHS students can be concurrently enrolled at Mendocino College.  Students must complete a MCC College application and submit a K-12 Special Admissions form to their counselor for approval.  Students can take coursework at MCC for coursework above and beyond UHS Graduation requirements and/or for credit recovery.  For every one college unit, the student is awarded 3.33 credits of high school.  Students must submit a transcript to the UHS registrar after the course is completed in order for the grade and credit to appear on their high school transcript.

DUAL ENROLLMENT- MENDOCINO COLLEGE @ Ukiahi

UHS offers a number of Mendocino College Courses on campus.  These courses are only open to UHS students.  Students who are interested in taking a Dual Enrollment course must complete a Mendocino College Application for Admission AND a CCAP Agreement form.  The CCAP agreement form must be signed by the CTE Coordinator for approval.  Students who do not complete the necessary paperwork required for Dual Enrollment will be dropped from the course.

COMPLETE CTE PATHWAYs (CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION) (CTE)

Students are considered CTE Pathway completers when they complete two courses in the same pathway with a C or better.  Completing a CTE Pathway is a way for students to prepare themselves to be college and career ready when they graduate from Ukiah High School.  Students who focus on a Pathway acquire the skills necessary for entry into well-paid careers with high potential for rapid financial growth, increased levels of responsibility, and a high degree of personal satisfaction.  This planning guide identifies courses that are part of a specific pathway offered at Ukiah High School.  Pathway courses can be found within the CTE section and subject specific sections.  One a student completes a CTE Pathway they are strongly encouraged to complete a CTE Internship.  See this link for more information about CTE classes. 

AP COURSES (ADVANCED PLACEMENT)

Advanced Placement Courses give students the opportunity to take College Board Approved coursework that gives students an AP experience and AP College Credit with the passing of the subject area AP exam with a score of 3 or better.  The courses are taught by AP trained teachers.

SEAL OF BILITERACY

The Seal of Biliteracy is a Seal recognized by the State of California for students demonstrating proficiency in English and one other language.  Students should review the Seal of Biliteracy requirements related to the year they graduate as the requirements change slightly from year to year, in particular during the Pandemic year.  The requirements include demonstrating proficiency in the English Language by receiving a Standard on the SBAC assessment in English (waived for Class of 2021) AND completion of all high school graduation requirements in English with a 2.0 or above overall, attained proficiency level on the ELPAC assessment (for English Learners only).  Additionally, the proficiency in another language can be demonstrated by ONE of the following:  Receive at 3 or above on the Advanced Placement Language Test in a language other than English, completion of a 4-year language course of study with a 3.0 or higher of which an AP Language course is included to demonstrate oral proficiency, OR passing the SAT II Foreign Language Exam with a score of 600 or higher.

3 YEAR COMMITMENT

A 3 Year Commitment to MESA, FFA, Leadership, Performing Arts, Yearbook, Journalism, Community Service, Academic Team Competitions or Athletics demonstrates dedication to programs available at Ukiah High.  If you have the desire to commit to one of these passions at Ukiah High let your school counselor know!


COURSE INFORMATION


COURSE DESCRIPTION LEGEND

Bolded Course ID# denotes CSU/UC approved course   

A-G letter denotes which specific A-G requirement is satisfied with that course

(9-12) denotes grades in which a student may take a course.

(Pathway Course) denotes Career Technical Education Pathway Courses 

Courses are listed by subject area.  Subject Areas are highlighted in yellow.

Dual Enrollment denoted in bold with Mendocino College (Dual Enrollment)

Prerequisites listed are courses or grades needed to take the course

Placement listed are courses that require you to place at that level

LIMITED SCHEDULE CHANGES

In order to have the most desired schedule possible, it is important for students to work with their counselor during the normal Spring scheduling cycle. Once schedules are released in August, changes are not guaranteed.  Priority will be given to students who are missing a class for graduation, are in the wrong level, or need a course to complete their A-G requirements, or who completed summer work that impacts their course selection.  Students are expected to take care of these changes prior to the first day of school and will be made based on space in classes.


Please note:  Additions and corrections from the 2021-2022 Planning Guide should be reported to room A-13 for inclusion in next year’s publication.



CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION


CHILD DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY

Mendocino College Course (Dual Enrollment)

Child Development 125

Creative Activities

(Pathway Course 1) CDV125 (9-12) CDV 125 is a Mendocino College Course offered at UHS.  Gak, oobleck, painting, games and food are some of the hands-on activities you’ll enjoy in this class as you learn about how children grow and learn. This is an opportunity to explore the possibilities of careers working with children.  It will prepare you for teaching preschool and elementary school children as well as working with children in other fields such as health and recreation.  Theories of child growth, development, and guidance (how do you help children learn to behave?) are studied in the classroom with time to observe children and to play with early childhood activities. 

Learn more about Child Development here.

Prerequisite: Enrollment through Mendocino College.

Mendocino College Course (Dual Enrollment)

Child Development 101 

(Pathway Course 2) 751101 (10-12) CDV 101 is a Mendocino College Course offered at UHS and is designed for students interested in Careers with Children.  Spend several days a week off campus working in an actual classroom with children from preschool through middle school (you pick the age you’re interested in), working as a classroom aide. It’s the perfect chance to decide if teaching is right for you and to have a change of scenery for part of your school day! You’ll be gaining practical, on-the-job skills while earning college and high school credit. 

Learn more about Child Development here.

Prerequisite: CDV 125 and enrollment through Mendocino College

FASHION DESIGN AND MERCHANDISING PATHWAY

Fashion Design (Pathway Course 1) 781001 (9-12) Create your own original clothing in this course that teaches the fundamentals of sewing using up-to-date electronic sewing machines in our fashion lab.  You will learn how to determine pattern size, select and purchase fabrics, use patterns and construct garments.   Individualized projects are designed for both young men and women.  Students also explore the elements and principles of design and fashion styles throughout history.   (VPA) F 

Learn more about Fashion Design  here.

Advanced Fashion Design 

(Pathway Course 2) 781101 (10-12) Advanced techniques and new experiences in clothing with emphasis on consumer awareness in the purchasing of fabrics and notions, wardrobe planning, pattern alterations, inner construction, recycling, review of basic skills, machine repairs and maintenance, and an overview of career opportunities in the field. This course may be repeated.  (VPA for graduation only)

Prerequisite: C or better in Fashion Design


CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION PATHWAY

Media Studies

(Pathway Course 1)724401(9-12) The first semester of this course students will participate in lectures on film theory and history.  They will learn the basics of film production, which will include different camera shots, sound design, scripting, lighting, and editing.  During the second semester, students will break into teams and with guidance assign themselves roles such as: writer, director, producer, camera operator, sound and post production.  They will write, cast, produce, and edit their own short films. (VPA) F.

Prerequisite: none

Advanced Media Studies

(Pathway Course 2)724501(10-12) This course is focused on advanced film production, which will include different camera shots, sound design, scripting, lighting, and editing.  Ideal for students who are interested in a career as a writer, director, producer, camera operator, sound and post production.  Students will write, cast, produce, and edit their own short films. 

Prerequisite:  C or better in Media Studies

MACHINING AND FORMING TECHNOLOGIES PATHWAY

Machine Tool 

(Pathway Course 1)822001 (9-12) Interested in how things are made?  Want to learn how to make precision parts out of metal or plastic?  Then Machine Shop is for you!   Students will get an opportunity to melt metal in our forge and cast blanks.  Then we will machine these blanks into parts using lathes and milling machines.  Whether you like cars, bikes, planes or trains, most of the parts were made using the processes used in the Machine Shop class. Take advantage of our beautiful shop and turn your ideas into reality.  This class is a must for engineering students or for those interested in a career in manufacturing. Learn more about Machine Tool class  here.

Prerequisite: no entry after first 3 weeks

Advanced Machine Tool 

(Pathway Course 2)822101 (10-12) The course will take students to the next level and allow students to complete the Machine and Forming Technologies pathway.  Students will learn to machine all parts necessary for a project from start to finish using both lathes and milling machines.  Students will be required to use the knowledge they acquired during their first year to fully manufacture their product.

Prerequisite: C or better in Machine Tool

NETWORKING PATHWAY

Explore Computer Science Networking (ECS) 

(Pathway Course 1)813102 (9-11) Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is a nationally recognized introductory college preparatory computer science course.  The course was developed around a framework of both computer science content and computational practice. Assignments are socially relevant and meaningful for diverse students. Topics include: Human Computer Interaction, Problem Solving, Web Design, Programming, Computing and Data Analysis and Robotics. This course is a prerequisite for students wanting to pursue Network Security as an advanced capstone course and is best suited for students interested in pursuing careers in network security, computer forensics, and information security (G)

Network Security

(Pathway Course 2)812201/812202 (10-12) This course provides an in-depth study of Network Security fundamentals and provides a comprehensive overview of network security, including computer forensics. Students will gain the knowledge and skills required to identify risk and participate in risk mitigation activities; provide infrastructure, application, operational, and information security; apply security controls to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and availability; identify appropriate technologies and products; and operate with an awareness of applicable policies, laws, and regulations.  

Prerequisite:  C or better in ECS Networking

SOFTWARE AND SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT PATHWAY

Explore Computer Science Systems Pro (ECS) 

(Pathway Course 1)813101 (9-11) Exploring Computer Science (ECS) is a nationally recognized introductory college preparatory computer science course and includes curriculum, professional development and assessments. ECS is a yearlong course consisting of six units, approximately six weeks each. The course was developed around a framework of both computer science content and computational practice. Assignments and instruction are contextualized to be socially relevant and meaningful for diverse students. Units include final projects around the following topics: Human Computer Interaction, Problem Solving, Web Design, Programming, Computing and Data Analysis and Robotics. This course is a prerequisite for students wanting to pursue AP Computer Science as an advanced capstone course and is best suited for students interested in pursuing careers in computer science and programming. (G)

CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

AP Computer Science Principles

 (Pathway Course 2)824102 (10-12) AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) is for students who are interested in pursuing interests in digital projects like apps, films, games or music that showcase their creativity, and use their creations to make a difference in your community.  The AP Computer Science Principles (AP CSP) course introduces you to the essential ideas of computer science and shows how computing and technology can influence the world around you.  The curriculum is based on Seven Big Ideas: Creativity, Abstraction, Data, Algorithms, Programming, Internet, Global Impact. (D)

Prerequisite: C or better in ECS Systems Pro

PATIENT CARE PATHWAY

Scrubs Patient Care

(Pathway Course 1)792103 (9-11) Scrubs PC is an entry level health occupations awareness program.  Students will be introduced to multiple careers where working with and helping people are the primary goals. These patient care careers include: Medical careers,dentistry, nursing and other public service and health fields. The course includes basic anatomy and physiology of the human body, and instruction on various employability skills including active listening, empathy, and professional conduct. This course  also incorporates first aid and CPR certification, but this is NOT the main priority. Medical terminology, anatomy and physiology are the foundation which readies the student for our advanced course medical terminology. Scrubs PCis the prerequisite class for Medical Terminology. (G)

Learn more about the SCRUBS class here.

Mendocino College Course (Dual Enrollment)

Health 104- Medical Terminology

(Pathway Course 2)

HLH104 (10-12) The Medical Terminology course provides students with an understanding of the language of medicine through the study of root words, suffixes and prefixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Terms for anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed for multiple body systems.

Prerequisite: Scrubs Patient Care and Enrollment through Mendocino College. 

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PATHWAY

Scrubs Emergency Response

(Pathway Course 1)842101 (9-11) Scrubs ER is an entry level health occupations awareness program. The course incorporates first aid and CPR certification, disaster preparedness, basic anatomy and physiology of the human body, and instruction on various employability skills including active listening, empathy, and professional conduct.  Students will be introduced to multiple careers where working with and helping people are the primary goals. These emergency response careers include fire services, emergency medical services, law enforcement and other public service and health fields. Students will learn about emergency scene organization, and teamwork under high pressure.  Scrubs ER is the prerequisite class for First Aid/Emergency/CPR (aka Extreme Responders). (G)

Mendocino College Course (Dual Enrollment)

Emergency Medical Services 202

First Aid/Emergency/CPR

(Pathway Course 2)792101/792102 (11-12) In the first semester students will be taught about advanced first aid through the Emergency Medical Responder course.  Students will learn the EMT level patient assessment, advanced skills such as oxygen therapy and will explore opportunities including job shadows and first aid stand by at UHS sporting events.  On successful completion of the first semester and final test, the student will be certified as an Emergency Medical Responder. The second semester consists of wilderness first aid and survival.   Career readiness will also be emphasized with multiple professionals teaching skills and techniques in emergency medical services, fire service. Law enforcement officers will present information about their careers.

Prerequisite: Scrubs ER and enrollment through Mendocino College.

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE PATHWAY

Floral Design

716301 (9-11)  The Art and History of Floral Design provides students with a basic knowledge of artistic perception, creative expression, historical and cultural context(s), aesthetic valuing and connections, relations, and application of the visual arts through the design of floral arrangements. Students will connect and apply what is learned in floral art to other art forms, subjects, and postsecondary educational experiences and careers.  Students will research and study floral trends to understand and develop an appreciation for floral design within historical and cultural, formal and casual, ceremonial and traditional, including understanding that floral designs are affected by society, culture, history, politics, and economic influence.  Throughout the course, students will be graded on participation in intracurricular FFA activities as well as development and maintenance of an ongoing supervised agricultural experience (SAE) program.  VPA (F)


CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Advanced Horticulture

(Pathway Course 2) 716201 (10– 12) This course prepares students for careers in the nursery, landscaping, and floral industries.  Topics include plant identification, plant physiology, soil science, plant reproduction, nursery production, and floriculture, as well as landscaping design, installation, and maintenance.  Throughout the course, students will be graded on participation in intracurricular FFA activities as well as development and maintenance of an ongoing supervised agricultural experience (SAE) program. Elective Credit only.

Prerequisite: Floral Design with a C or better

ANIMAL SCIENCE PATHWAY

Veterinary Practices

(Pathway Course 2) 714202 (10-12) This course provides a study of common diseases of both small and large animals, the causes and means of prevention. Course work will include anatomy and physiology of domestic animals, nutrition, and parasites and diseases. Guest lectures, veterinarians, vector control officials and animal health technicians will also be provided to add knowledge of current practices that are implemented in the animal health fields. Students will gain practical experience in veterinary medicine by conducting hands-on activities with livestock. 

Elective Credit only 

Prerequisite: Intro to Ag Science with a C or better

PRODUCT INNOVATION AND DESIGN PATHWAY

Computer Aided Drafting (CP CAD)

(Pathway Course 1)

824002 (9-12) This class is an introduction to the design process of products and buildings. We will use real world design challenges to design a product to solve that challenge. We will use sketching, 2 dimensional computer drafting, computer based 3 dimensional modeling and rapid prototyping using 3D printers, computer controlled router, CNC milling machine and lasers! If you are interested in Engineering or Architecture you should be in this class!(G)

No prerequisites and no repeating.

Advanced Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Product Design

(Pathway Course 2)

824101 (10-12) We will build on the principles of the Intro class and focus on designing products for mass production. We will create a whole class project that we will use as a fundraiser. We will find a design challenge, develop a solution, make a working prototype, refine the design, produce it and sell it. MUST have received a B or better in Intro to CAD to enroll. This class may be repeated.

Prerequisite: CAD with a C or better.

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL PATHWAY 

Construction Fundamentals

(Pathway Course 1)734101 (9-11) Do you want to learn how to build houses? In the Construction Class you will learn how to use the required tools safely to build a basic structure that will include common residential construction techniques. We will cover foundations, framing, roofing and finishing. This course is offered as a dual enrollment course meaning you will receive college credit for SCT 180A Construction Fundamentals. After completing this course you can move on to Advanced Construction to complete the construction pathway. This course will give you the skills and confidence to get an entry level job with a construction company.

Advanced Construction 

(Pathway Course 2)734102 (10-12) Ready to take your construction skills to the next level?  In this course we will be building a tiny house that will have all the features of a home in a smaller package.  You will learn new techniques and improve your skills.  We will build on your knowledge of framing, plumbing, electrical, roofing and finish carpentry.  By the end of the year you will be able to proudly say that you helped build a house that someone can comfortably live in.  This course is the 2nd pathway course to Construction Fundamentals

Prerequisite: Construction Fundamentals with a C or better.

SYSTEMS DIAGNOSTICS, SERVICE, AND REPAIR PATHWAY 

Automotive Technology I

(Pathway Course 1)853101 (9-12) Auto Technology 1 is designed to develop basic cognitive and performance skills for automotive repair in the following areas: Basic maintenance, basic electrical, wheels and tires, steering and suspension, and brakes.

Prerequisite: none





CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Advanced Automotive Technology

(Pathway Course 2)853201(10-12)AdvancedAutomotive Technology is designed to develop more advanced  cognitive and performance skills for the automotive repair industry and to prepare students to enter an associate’s degree program in automotive technology or gain entry level employment. The areas of focus are as follows: Engines, Electrical, Engine Performance and Air Conditioning.  

Prerequisite: Automotive Technology I with a C or better.

WELDING AND MATERIALS JOINING PATHWAY

Welding Tech 

(Pathway Course 1)823001 (9-12) The course will instruct the student in the basic art of welding, including safety in the welding environment, the use of power and hand tools for welding.  Learn SMAW (stick), GMAW (MIG), Oxy-Fuel cutting, and plasma cutting.  The course will provide both technical and practical exercises in the art of welding.  Students will have class time for technical information as well as shop time to practice the skills that are learned in the classroom.  After completing this course you will receive a certificate of completion; this course will also prepare you for the advanced welding course.  You will be a member of SKILLS USA Club and have the opportunity to compete in the leadership and welding competitions

Prerequisite: none

Advanced Welding Technology 

(Pathway Course 2)823101 (10-12) This course will prepare you for a plate and pipe certification.  GTAW (TIG and CNC Plasma cutting will be taught to 2nd year students as well as learning how to work as a group and employability skills.  Class time and shop time for safety in the workplace, technical information and practical welding of plate steel and pipe, and AWS (American Welding Society) Standards.  At the end of the course you will have a welding certification for plate steel or pipe, or receive certifications in both.  This course will give the skills needed for the welding community and give you the skills required for the Fabrication/Design course.  You will be a member of SKILLS USA Club and have the opportunity to compete in the leadership and welding competitions.

Prerequisite: Welding Technology with a C or better

 CTE INTERNSHIP PATHWAY

Next Steps: CTE Internship                                

490101 (12) You are a CTE pathway completer?.  Now what?  Let’s put your class skills to work at an internship!  You will spend two days a week in class, and up to 3 days in an internship polishing the skills that you learned in your CTE course.  Come learn more skills which help you get and keep a job.

This course is a 2 period block at the end of the day.


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (VPA)

MUSICAL PERFORMING ARTS

Beginning Guitar

232501 (9-12) This class is designed for students with little or no previous guitar experience. Students will learn basic guitar skills including chords, reading tablature, single note melodies and solos, fingerpicking, blues progressions, and playing with others. Students will also learn about the history of the instrument, important guitarists in various genres, parts of the instrument, and how to re-string their guitars. Instruments are available, but limited.

Concert Band 

230001 (9-12) Concert Band is the first full year of music instruction on student’s instruments.  This concert band class develops skills on a variety of woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Emphasis is given to providing a strong fundamental approach to the student’s chosen instrument. Rehearsal and instruction from music that the Director selects and provides will be accomplished daily, as well as developmental music theory in the classroom setting. Practice outside of normal school hours is required as part of this class. Learn more about Concert  band  here.

Jazz Ensemble

230505 (9-12) Jazz Ensemble is a high performing group that plays a variety of repertoire, including jazz, rock, blues, Latin, and fusion. Students will be exposed to perhaps one of America’s most important cultural innovations through the history of jazz, jazz theory and improvisation.  In order to have a successful jazz ensemble, it is necessary for students to be dedicated to music and maintain a strong background in reading music. Jazz Ensemble instrumentation traditionally includes, piano, bass, drums, guitar, auxiliary percussion, trumpet, trombone, and saxophone. This class is a 7th period class. (VPA) F

Prerequisite: Concert Band and/or Audition


VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS (VPA)

Wind Ensemble 

230302 (9-12) Wind Ensemble performs at the highest level of musicianship and technical ability. This class is split into two time periods: the first part of the year focuses on Marching Band while the remaining portion of the year is regular Wind Ensemble.  Instruction concentrates on advanced playing technique, music reading skills, and mature musical expression and interpretation. Practicing outside of school is required for this class. This class is part of a sequential band program, and is open for audition for all intermediate and advanced students of woodwind, brass wind, and percussion instruments. (VPA) F

Prerequisite: Concert Band/Audition


MUSIC NON PERFORMING

History of Jazz and Rock, Music in World Culture - MUS 208 & MUS209

902001/902002 (10-12) This course is a dual enrollment course with Mendocino College. This course will explore American popular music in the 19th and 20th centuries from early American songwriting, Tin Pan Alley, jazz, blues, rock, and the music industry up to Hip Hop p-Hop. You do not need to be able to play an instrument or have prior musical knowledge take this course. For elective credit.

Prerequisite- C or better in CP English


THEATER PERFORMING ARTS

Introduction to Drama

290404 (9) This course introduces students to a variety of acting theories and techniques. Introduction to group work, partner work, improvisations, and performing memorized scenes will be covered throughout the year. Also techniques in stage combat, voice, theatre etiquette, and speech will be covered along with a brief history of theatre and the use of stagecraft. Upon completion students may move into Advanced Drama with teacher recommendation, or go into Drama I. (VPA) F Learn more about Drama  here.

Drama I

290405 (10-12) This course is for students with no drama experience or for those who have taken Intro to Drama.  Students will be introduced to a variety of acting theories and techniques. Group work, partner work, improvisations, and performing memorized scenes will be covered throughout the year. Also techniques in stage combat, voice, theatre etiquette, and speech will be covered along with a brief history of theatre and the use of stagecraft.  Upon completion students may move into Advanced Drama with teacher recommendation or repeat Drama I.  (VPA) F

Advanced Drama

290406 (10-12) Students will be analyzing scripts, rehearsing, assisting with set construction, costume design, lighting/sound, etc. in preparation for performances in class and for the community.   Students will be involved in the whole rehearsal process as well as learning 'Theatre History' and working on a unit of "Mask Making".  This is a performance based class and students must be self-motivated.  Attendance is a must. This is a repeatable class.

(VPA) F Prerequisite: Intro to Drama, Drama I, Audition or Teacher Recommendation.

Musical Theater

290407 (9-12) Students will learn acting, singing and dancing skills to increase their knowledge in the areas and make them competitive members in show business.  Students will receive acting, singing, and dancing lessons in a group and individual setting, where they can develop and foster their skills as budding musicians, actors and dancers.

VOCAL PERFORMING ARTS

Bass Chorus

230511 (9-12) This multi-level vocal group explores music written for the male voice.  This ensemble regularly performs contemporary, Barbershop and a cappella music that is written in three and four part harmonies.  The nature of this class is more of a “vocal group,” with singers performing one or two to a handheld microphone.  Bass Chorus is not limited to males, but all singers must feel comfortable and be able to sing in the regular male range.  

Prerequisite: Contact Josh Small, Instructor

This course is repeatable.  (VPA) F

Concert Choir

230509 (9-12) This beginning to intermediate ensemble performs choral work, show tunes and popular music, while still developing the musicianship skills and vocal technique of the individual singers.  Concert choir will perform music in two and three part harmonies for the school and surrounding communities.  (VPA) F

This course is repeatable.Click here to learn more about our choir.classes.

Vocal Ensemble

230510 (9-12) This audition-only ensemble consists of twenty-four competent musicians and skilled singers who will explore and perform an eclectic and wide variety of music.  The singers accepted into this group will need to pass a comprehensive musical placement audition and will continue to develop their vocal technique and hone their musicianship skills throughout the year.  Due to the heavy performance nature of this ensemble, dedication, diligence and determination is required from all participants. (VPA) F

Placement: by audition with the director in April or May of the previous school year.Click here to learn more about our choir.classes.


VISUAL ARTS

PHOTOGRAPHY PATHWAY

Mendocino College Course (Dual Enrollment)

Art 282 Intro to Photography

(Pathway Course 1)

ART282 (9-12) Introduction to technical, aesthetical, historical, and commercial aspects of photography through lectures, presentations, and hands-on practices. First semester instruction focuses on image composition, basic camera operations and techniques, and editing. The second part of the course introduces students to Photoshop, studio lighting techniques, and practical applications of the art.  This course is a prerequisite to Advance Photography and highly recommended for Yearbook.See more about Intro to Photography  here.

Prerequisite: Enrollment through Mendocino College.

Advanced Photography 

(Pathway Course 2)

721801(10-12) Exploration of advanced camera and Photoshop techniques through class assignments and individual projects, Students will expand on skills used in studio lighting, documentary, commercial, and still life photography.  Graphic design and image use in design will be covered as well as an examination of photography careers and application of skills learned to various professions.  Students will build their digital and print portfolios and focus on exhibition, publishing and presentation of their work.  (VPA) F

requisite:C or better in Beginning Photography

Ceramics Studio

280001 (10-12) Instruction in hand-building and decorating techniques and basic wheel-throwing techniques is offered.  Proficiency in aesthetic and technical skills is gained by completing assigned work at increasing levels of difficulty, but each assignment allows for individual creativity.  A historic and cultural appreciation of pottery making is emphasized in specific assignments related to the ceramic arts of other Western and non-Western peoples. (VPA) F

Prerequisite: none 

Learn more about the ceramics class here.

Advanced Ceramics Studio

280002 (11-12) Further exploration and skill development building on the beginning Ceramics Studio fundamentals.  Continued study of design elements and techniques of hand-building and throwing on the wheel and of diverse pottery-making cultures and contemporary trends.  Craftsmanship, aesthetics, and individuality of expression are emphasized.  Written and other work outside of class is expected.  Advanced Ceramics Studio may be repeated for credit.   (VPA) F

Prerequisite: C or better in Ceramics Studio

Drawing 

280601 (9-12) This class offers the student an intense immersion into drawing concepts and techniques via pencil, ink, colored pencil, and printmaking.  Assigned work thoroughly explores each medium, and the successful student will greatly improve his skills in, and understanding of, this traditional artistic method.  This class may be repeated for credit.  This class is a prerequisite for Advanced Art. (VPA) F 

Prerequisite: none

Introduction to Art

282301 (9-12) This class is an introductory class for any student starting a course of study in 2D or 3D art.  Basic artistic concepts and skills such as observational drawing, painting, printmaking, and a connection to art historical content will be explored through assignments.  Students will develop, craft, interpret, and grapple with creative problem solving to apply new skills and envision their own responses to assignments through visual art.  This class may be repeated. This class is a prerequisite for Advanced Art. Learn more about the art department here.

(VPA) F

Prerequisite: none

Advanced Art

289806 (10-12) The primary objective of this course is to encourage individual creative growth and further deepen art skills and understanding.  Though group units of exploration are assigned, students will pursue and develop an independent course of study with instructor approval.  Class is split between whole class assignments designed to build on the foundations students have in drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture, and the development of individual portfolios.  Class critiques will encourage critical evaluation of student work and students are expected to be dynamic participants in all aspects of class from studio practice, to discussion, to exhibitions.  Advanced art students should be self-motivated and passionate about their growth of art.  This class may be repeated for credit.   (VPA) F

Prerequisite: B or better in Introduction to Art or Drawing

ENGLISH

English I

213001 (9) This one-year college preparatory course is designed for students with average and above average ability.  It is designed to develop skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, with an emphasis on literary terms and their application in literary discussion and analysis. The course includes an introduction to literature with a study of literary types, as well as basic research skills with an emphasis on source citation. An introduction to Greek and Latin roots and derivatives comprise the focus of vocabulary building and decoding skill development.  (B) NCAA

English II

213101 (10) This one-year college preparatory course is designed for students with average and above average ability.  Continued attention is given to the development of reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking skills.  Emphasis in literature is on the understanding and appreciation of literature. Exploration of expository texts and research skills continue to foster mastery. Continued focus on Greek and Latin roots and derivatives comprises the focus of vocabulary building and decoding skill development at this level. (B) NCAA

English III

213202 (11) This one-year college preparatory course is intended for students with average and above average ability.  Development in composition skills is on organization and writing of more complex papers.  Emphasis in literature is on the understanding and appreciation of quality American literature (B) NCAA

English IV

213302 (12) This one-year college preparatory course is designed for student’s average and with average and above average ability. The course focuses upon the development of essay writing skills, public speaking skills and vocabulary. It further develops the ability of the student to understand British and World literature. (B) NCAA

Expository Reading and Writing (ERW)

210208 (12) ERW is a 12th grade statewide approved Expository Reading and Writing Course that has been developed by the California State Universities, the California Community Colleges, and their use of the Early Assessment Plan (EAP).  The goals of both ERW and EAP are to develop the non-fiction reading and argumentative writing skills necessary for graduating high school seniors. Completion of the ERW course with a grade of a C or better will satisfy placement into college level English at both CSU and Community Colleges, saving both time and money.   Expository Reading and Writing will cover some of the same British and World 12th grade core curriculum, but in contrast to English IV, Expository Reading and Writing will focus less on literature and more on non-fiction and argumentative writing. (B) NCAA

Placement: “Conditional” Pass on the Early Assessment Placement exam (EAP)

English II Honors

213103 (10) This one-year college preparatory course is designed for students of above-average ability.  The objectives of this course are the same as the objectives of English II, with the addition of preparation for AP Language and AP Literature courses through extended study of Rhetoric and elements of Voice. Brisk pace and demanding assignments ensure rigor and challenge the needs and interests of advanced students who choose to enroll in AP Language. 

Placement: Examination, GPA, teacher recommendation, attendance record and/or additional preparatory work. 

 (B) NCAA

AP Language and Composition

217001 (11) This one-year course is designed for students with above-average ability who has had and/or would like to pursue honors study in English.  Course content will be concerned with the study of representative examples of American literature from the 17th through the 21st centuries.  All the skills of rhetoric will be stressed in tests and in individual written projects concerning the historical, literary, and social background of the period being discussed.  Periodic oral reports will be required.  The class is intended for students who plan to attend college and should not be attempted by students who are not willing to work at full capacity.  Students completing this course are prepared to take the AP English Language Examination. Students completing this course are prepared to take the AP English Language Examination. (B) NCAA

Placement: Pre-AP English 10 teacher recommendation or entrance examination

AP Literature and Composition  

217101 (12) Advanced Placement English is a rigorous, college-level class that provides an intensive, in-depth study of the major genres of literature in preparation for the AP Exam.  The primary goal of the course is to develop students’ abilities as readers, writers, and critics of literature.  (B) NCAA 

Placement: AP English Language teacher recommendation or entrance examination


ENGLISH

DEVELOPMENTAL ENGLISH (NON-COLLEGE PREP)

Junior English

210206 (11) This course is a non-college prep course designed to develop the skills of reading, composition, spelling and grammar in 11th graders who read below grade level.  The course includes an introduction to literature and American themes with a study of literary types emphasizing remediation of below average writing skills.  

Placement:  By Reading Specialist only

Senior English

210207 (12) This course is a non-college prep course designed for students of below average ability.  The course focuses on the development of essay writing skills, public speaking skills, and vocabulary.  It further develops the ability of the student to understand literature.  

Placement: By Reading Specialist only.

ENGLISH SUPPORT

English Read 180

210001

(9-10)English Read 180 is an intensive reading intervention program designed to meet the needs of students whose reading achievement is below the proficient level.  The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction in reading and writing skills. This course is a supplemental program to support a student’s English course.  Elective credit. (G)

Placement:  By Reading Specialist only

ELA I/ELD I – ELD Beginning

211007/211003   Emphasis will be placed on understanding spoken English as used in the classroom, the community, and the student’s surroundings.  Reading and writing skills will be used as the listening and speaking ability of the student grows.  The curriculum is aligned with the state standards for English Language Development.  Students should have at least a B grade or teacher recommendation to go on to ELD II.  This is a two period class.  

Placement: By EL Coordinator only

ELA II/ELD II Early Intermediate/Intermediate

211008/211004 (9-12) Emphasis will be placed on the continual development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing the English language using the structures introduced in ELD I.  There will be additional structures introduced in ELD I. The purpose of this course is to complete the preparation necessary for the student to participate successfully into Grade level English.  The course will be split into two parts.  (1) Mastery of basic skills, listening, speaking, reading, and writing; (2) Application of language skills to the study of materials and themes appropriate to transition English courses.  The curriculum is aligned with the state standards for English Language Development.  

Prerequisite: ELD I and/or completion of ELD I test

Placement: By EL Coordinator only

Eng. 3D I, II, III-- A Systematic Approach to the Acquisition of Academic English

211012/ 211013/ 211014 (9-12) These courses support English Learners at the Early Intermediate and Intermediate levels based on the ELPAC Assessment. Students are concurrently enrolled in a Grade level English course to support the acquisition of the academic vocabulary, speaking, listening, and writing vital to success in school and life, through this state-approved systematic program developed by Dr. Kate Kinsella. The English 3D Curriculum centers around current issues of high interest to high school students as the vehicle through which students produce nuanced, academic language which supports their success in all academic courses. (G)

Placement: By EL Coordinator  Level: By Grade Level

ENGLISH ELECTIVES

Creative Writing

219804 (9-12) Creative writing is an English elective class that focuses on understanding and creating the imaginative writer’s voice.  Students will read, write, present and discuss the genres of creative writing including poetry, the short story, the novel, dramatic plays, and screenplays.  Although this is designed to be a fun elective, students must still be ready to handle a moderate workload of reading and writing.  Creative writing will not replace any required English class.  (G)  NCAA

Prerequisite:  A grade of C or better in previous English class

Journalism 

211103 (9-12) Journalism is a one year course designed for students interested in newspaper journalism and developing their skills as a writer. The course explores the contemporary media and the ethical responsibility issues inherent in the press today. Students will learn the fundamentals of news, feature, editorial and sports writing. Copy reading, news style, and editing will be stressed. Students will create numerous original stories using varied structures and writing techniques. Students will also learn to create computer generated layouts, graphics. Students will also explore social media optimization.  (G)  NCAA 

Learn more about the journalism class here.

Advanced Journalism 

211102 (10-12) Advanced Journalism is a one year course designed for students who've established themselves as skilled reporters and seek new challenges in the newsroom. Advanced Journalism pushes young journalists into the realms of investigative journalism. Advanced Journalism students will comb the community for primary documents that trace back Ukiah's history. These students will experiment with documentary creation, podcasting, and other forms of alternative media. Most Advanced Journalism students take on some sort of leadership role within the UHS News newsroom (G)

Prerequisite: Journalism

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Northern Pomo 1

913032  Northern Pomo 1 is designed for any student interested in the Northern Pomo Language as well as for college preparatory students who plan on attending a four-year college or university.

This course provides students with opportunities to develop the skills necessary to

communicate effectively in the Northern Pomo language at the beginning competency level

and to appreciate the local Native American culture. (Pending E)

Prerequisite: English with a C or better

Spanish I

220601 Spanish I is designed for academically-oriented students with little to no prior experience with the Spanish language. It is a college preparatory course that focuses on the 4 language learning goals: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students learn a range of introductory level vocabulary involving themes such as school, shopping, pastimes, and family structure. Students will be competent using the present tense and the simple future (“going to”). Graduates of the course will be able to follow simple instructions in Spanish and be able to ask and answer simple Spanish questions in complete sentences. Daily homework and class participation form an important part of the student’s grade. (E)

Prerequisite: English with a C or better

Spanish II

220604   Spanish II continues the college-prep path of introduction to the Spanish language. Students in this course build more complex and academic vocabulary including such themes as one’s daily routine, childhood memories, athletics, and increasingly complex activities. Students will be competent using the present tense, the future tense, the present progressive, and the uses of the preterit vs. the imperfect in the past. Emphasis is placed on the preterit/imperfect. Graduates of the course will be able to conduct authentic conversations in Spanish, respond to complex instructions, and be able to ask and answer complex Spanish both verbally and in writing.  Daily homework and class participation form an important part of the student’s grade. (E)

Prerequisite: Spanish I with a C or better

Spanish III

220701   This course is designed for students who are college-bound or are simply interested in an advanced and rigorous study of Spanish. Students will expand a complex, high-level vocabulary focusing on academic themes such as art, self and society, politics, and justice. Students will achieve competence in many advanced grammatical structures including: the subjunctive, the present perfect, the pluperfect, the conditional, and the imperative tenses. Students will be expected to conduct themselves in Spanish and will move towards complete Spanish interaction by the end of the year. They will begin to read complex texts and be able to respond intelligently and extensively both 

verbally and in writing both to the texts, to each other, and to the teacher. A strong foundation with the preterit and imperfect tenses is highly recommended.  (E)

Prerequisite: Spanish II with a C or better

AP Spanish Language and Culture

227501   This rigorous course is designed for students who are planning to attend college after high school or who are interested in advanced study and fluency in the language. Students will build a college-level vocabulary around and familiarity with AP themes including Personal and Public Identity, Modern Life, Families and Communities, Beauty and Aesthetic, Science and Technology, and Global Challenges. Students will move towards mastery of all of the relevant grammatical forms in the language. They will be expected to conduct all conversation in Spanish and should expect to receive nearly all instruction in the target language. Students will read, listen to, and watch academic, college-level texts and respond both verbally and in writing with thoughtful, grammatically sound, and appropriate responses. Emphasis is placed on academic writing and speaking with an emphasis on cultural comparison. Students will work to prepare for the College Board Advanced Placement Test in May.  Successful completion of this exam (a score of 3 or better) partially qualifies a student for the Seal of Bi-literacy as well as constitutes transfer credit to many four-year universities. (E)

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish III with a C or better 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE

Spanish for Spanish Speakers I

222501 This college-prep course is intended for academically-oriented students who can speak and understand Spanish.  It is designed to develop skills in reading, speaking and writing, with an emphasis on sentence and paragraph structure. Development of spelling, vocabulary skills and grammar is also emphasized. The course also includes an introduction to literature with a study of literary genres. All materials and instruction may be completely delivered in Spanish. (E)

Prerequisites:  Successful completion of the K-8 Dual Language Immersion Program. 

Placement:  All students qualifying for the Spanish for Spanish Speakers Program will begin their first year of study in Level 1.  This course is designed to develop skills used in Levels 2 and beyond.  Incoming 9th graders can challenge the Level 1 course by taking and passing (C+ or better) the SSS Level 1 Challenge Exam.

Spanish for Spanish Speakers II

222502 This one-year course is designed for students with average and above average ability in Spanish. Continued attention is given to the development of reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking skills. Emphasis in literature genres: short stories, essays, poetry, novels, drama and translation on the understanding and appreciation of literature of the Spanish speaking world. All materials and instruction are completely in Spanish. (E)

Prerequisite:  SSSI with a grade of C or better.  Or passing the Spanish for Spanish Speakers I Challenge Exam with a C+ average or better.

Spanish for Spanish Speaker III Honors

220703   This course is a college-level literature course. This course is highly recommended for students that would like to continue their language study in Spanish, gaining a more extended appreciation of literature of the Spanish-speaking world.  The materials and instruction are delivered completely in Spanish. Students will develop a deeper sense of grammar, syntax and semantics of the target language by analyzing complex pieces of literature focusing on literature movements from the late nineteenth century to modern times. The materials and instruction are completely in Spanish.   This course also offers an extended practice and preparation for the AP Spanish Language and Culture examination by the College Board.  Successful completion of this exam (a score of 3 or better) partially qualifies a student for the Seal of Biliteracy. (E)

Prerequisites: SSS II with a grade of C or better. Or passing the SSS II End-of Course Exam with a C+ average or better.

AP Spanish Literature and Culture

227601   This course is a college-level literature course. This course is highly recommended for students that would like to continue their language study in Spanish, gaining a more extended appreciation of literature of the Spanish-speaking world.  The materials and instruction are delivered completely in Spanish. Students will develop a deeper sense of grammar, syntax and semantics of the target language by analyzing complex pieces of literature focusing on the required readings listed by the College Board. These readings will be studied within the context of the following AP themes: Creación del género, Las sociedades en contacto, La dualidad del ser, Tiempo y espacio y Relaciones interpersonales. The course also offers extended practice and preparation for the College Board’s AP Spanish Literature examination.  

Prerequisites:  SSS III Honors or AP Spanish Language and Culture with a grade of C or better

French I

220401   French I is designed for students with little to no

 prior experience with the French language. It is a college preparatory course that focuses on the 4 language learning goals: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Students learn a range of introductory level vocabulary involving themes such as school, the supermarket, pastimes, and family structure. Students will be competent using the present tense, the future (“going to”) and will be introduced to past tenses such as the preterit and the imperfect. Graduates of the course will be able to follow simple instructions in French and be able to ask and answer simple French questions in complete sentences. (E)

Prerequisite: C or better in English

French II

220403   French II continues the college-prep path of introduction to the French language. Students in this course will build a more complex and academic vocabulary including such themes as one’s daily routine, travelling, fashion, food, getting around the house, learning about the environment, technology and art. They will also be trained to complete increasingly complex activities. Students will be competent using the present tense, the future tense, the present progressive, and the uses of the preterit vs. the imperfect in the past. Emphasis is placed on the preterit/imperfect. Graduates of the course will be able to conduct authentic conversations in French, respond to complex instructions, and be able to ask and answer complex French both verbally and in writing. (E)

Prerequisite: Completion of French I with a C or better 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE

French III

220501   This course is designed for students who are college-bound or are simply interested in an advanced and rigorous study of French. Students will expand a complex, high-level vocabulary focusing on academic themes such as art, self and society, the environment and they will also be exposed to the history of France and to its literature. Students will read and study famous French authors such as Molière, Rousseau, Rabelais and more. Students will achieve competence in many advanced grammatical structures including: the subjunctive, the present perfect, the pluperfect, the conditional, and the imperative tenses. Students will be expected to conduct themselves in French and will move towards complete French interaction by the end of the year. They will begin to read complex texts and be able to respond intelligently and extensively both verbally and in writing both to the texts, to each other, and to the teacher.  A strong foundation with the preterit and imperfect tenses is highly recommended.  (E)

Prerequisite: Completion of French II with a C or better 

AP French Language and Culture

227101   AP French Language is a college-level language course designed to prepare students to take the AP test towards the end of the year. The rigorous course is designed for students who are going to college after high school or who are interested in advanced study and fluency in the language. Students will build a college-level vocabulary around themes including the families and communities, personal and public identities, beauty and aesthetics, Science and technology, global challenges and contemporary life. Students will move towards mastery of all of the relevant grammatical forms in the language. They will be expected to conduct all conversations in French and should expect to receive all instruction in the target language. Students will read academic, college-level texts and be able to respond both verbally and in writing with thoughtful, grammatically sound, and appropriate responses. Emphasis is placed on academic writing and literary analysis. Students are expected to prepare for the Advanced Placement Test administered by the College Board whether or not they take the actual test.  (E)

Prerequisite: French III with a C or better 


MATHEMATICS

Algebra I

240302   (9-12) this is a rigorous college preparatory class. Homework is assigned daily and is required.  Students must have good study skills and strong work habits.  The one-year course will prepare students for Algebra II and Geometry. (This course is also offered in Spanish for ELL students – Algebra I- SH, 240314) (C) NCAA

Placement: C or better on Math Placement exam and math teacher recommendation

Algebra Essentials 

240309 (11-12) Algebra Essentials minimizes the number of standards and the rigor of those standards in an effort to make Algebra accessible to all students. Students who pass Algebra Essentials will have met the State’s Algebra I graduation requirement

Prerequisite Unsuccessful completion of Alg I or Alg IB.

Placement: Math Placement exam and math teacher recommendation

Algebra II

240403 (9-12) this is a college preparatory course designed to 

prepare the student for Trigonometry. This course will improve problem solving abilities, deductive reasoning, and aid the student in the study of physics and chemistry.  Homework is regular and is required.  (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: Geometry with a C or better

AP Calculus AB

248001   (10-12) this course will provide the student of elementary calculus with a collection of carefully selected representative problems.  Calculus will deal in depth with limits, derivatives and integrals.  Use of graphing calculators is required.  A wide variety of application problems will be taught.  Calculus students can earn college credit upon passing the AP Calculus AB Exam.  (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: Trigonometry with a C or better (not C-)


MATHEMATICS

AP Calculus BC

248101   (11-12).  This course continues the study of first year college level calculus.  It included topics in sequences, series, differential equations, theoretical treatment of limits, polar and parametric functions, numerical approximation methods and other topics.  Use of graphing calculators is required.  A wide variety of application problems will be taught.  Calculus students can earn college credit upon passing the AP Calculus BC Exam.  (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: AP Calculus AB with a C or better (not C-)

Business Math

240102   (10-12) Are you interested in a CTE mathematics course that will help you get a job and take the mystery out of everyday business and financial decisions?  This course is designed to introduce students to careers in the banking and financial fields and to provide hands-on training for various entry-level positions in their community.  This course is also part of an articulation agreement with Mendocino College, and in the process of being an accepted Career Pathway course.  Topics to be covered include:  Banking, Money & Finance in Business, Personal Financial Planning, Investment Fundamentals, Stocks, Bonds, Mutual Funds, Taxes and Insurance, Ethics, Global Economy International Trade, Careers in the Banking and Financial fields etc.

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra math requirement

Data Science

925901 (10-12)Students will learn to be data explorers in project-based units, through which they will develop their understanding of data analysis, sampling, correlation/causation, bias and uncertainty, probability, modeling with data, making and evaluating data-based arguments, the power of data in society, and more! At the end of the course students will have a portfolio of their data science work to showcase their newly developed abilities.. It could lead to a pathway in calculus, statistics, data science, other STEM or humanities subjects.  Alternative or in addition to Algebra II.  (Pending C)

Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry with a C or better 

Geometry

241301 (9-12) This is a rigorous college preparatory course which coordinates special relationships and logical reasoning along with the use of algebra.  Geometry builds upon the knowledge of the relationships among geometric elements.  (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: Algebra I with a C or better 

Trigonometry/Advanced Mathematics

240701 (10-12) The course covers advanced algebra topics and trigonometry in a rigorous fashion.  Daily homework is required.  Graphing calculators are strongly recommended, with the TI-84 (plus or silver), the calculator of choice.  Students successfully completing this class can be recommended into Statistics or AP Calculus for the following year. (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: C or better (not C-) in Algebra II 

Honors Trigonometry/Advanced Math

240703 (10-12) This course covers the same topics as trig/advanced math at a greater level of sophistication.  It is very rigorous.  Graphing calculators are required, with the TI-84 the calculator of choice.  Students successfully completing this class can be recommended to AP Calculus for the following year, but may opt for Statistics. 

(C) NCAA

Prerequisite: B or better in Algebra II 

Statistics

248302 (11-12) This course is an introduction to probability and statistics with an emphasis on techniques and applications that are useful in business, engineering, social and biological sciences.  Statistics acquaints students with the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  (C) NCAA

Prerequisite: C or better Algebra II

MESA

609804 (9-12) MESA assists pre-college students (primarily from educationally disadvantaged backgrounds) to succeed in math and science studies in order to go on to college and major  in similarields.  In addition to receiving support in math and science classes, students will also be exposed to college preparatory activities such as college visitations, assistance with college and financial aid applications, development of personal statements, test preparation, career exploration, and peer-to-peer tutoring.  Students should be committed to preparing for, or enrolling in, college preparatory courses, which meet the UC and CSU admission requirements throughout their four years in high school.  During the second semester, all students will participate in hands-on STEM projects culminating in regional and statewide competitions.  

Placement: Selection Process is used for this course.

Minimum Criteria: C’s or better in A-G coursework and/or a plan to complete A-G requirements. 2.5 minimum GPA.  Enrolled in Algebra I no later than 10th grade.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Student PE 9

251401 (9) Freshmen Physical Education students are required to successfully complete units of learning that focus on aquatics, team sports, fitness, combatives, and gymnastics.  Student PE 9 is required for all 9th graders.

Student PE

251501 (10-12) Sophomore Physical Education students are required to successfully complete units of learning that focus on individual, dual and team sports, and basic weight training/conditioning.  Students also may elect to focus on units of learning in aquatics, outdoor education and/or repeat units already taken to improve their skills.  

Athletic Physical Education

251149 (10-12) APE is designed for students who participate in a school sponsored CIF sport and would like to earn Physical Education credit.  Students must participate in at least one sport and continue to train via pre-season and postseason programs.  Different options are available for the time that is not in season.  Examples would be club sport season practice/competition or off season strength and conditioning.  Students must account for 400 minutes of activity, every two weeks for PE Credit.

Prerequisite: Passed 9th grade PE with a C or better, passed the Fitness gram testing, and have participated in at least one CIF school sponsored sport.

Independent Study PE

251150 (10-12) ISPE is for students enrolled in Middle College who need to take PE to satisfy the high school graduation requirement.  Students involved in an advanced level individual non CIF school sponsored sport may also enroll in ISPE, with the approval of the ISPE coordinator.  ISPE affords students the opportunity to extend physical education learning activities beyond the school campus and regular school hours.  ISPE allows students advanced study in activities not normally available in Ukiah High’s physical education program.  Students must account for 400 minutes of activity, every two weeks.  Examples include gymnastics, dance, High School Rodeo, etc.).  For PE Credit.  This course is a 7th period option for those who meet the criteria

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in Middle College or participate in a competitive sport or high level performance activity and have completed Student PE 9 with a C or better and passed the Fitness gram testing.  Advanced approval needed to enroll.

PE Bfs

259802   (11-12) Junior and Senior Physical Education students are advised to successfully complete units of learning that focus on strength training and conditioning.  Students enrolled in this course will be involved in a program that utilizes weight training, plyometric, and agility drills.  The goal of this program is to develop muscular strength and endurance, quickness, power and speed.  For PE credit.

Mind Body Fitness

251509 (10-12) This course will consist of cardiovascular exercises in the form of (but not limited to) running, hi/lo impact movement, aerobic step, kickboxing, hiking, Pilates, Yoga, Piyo, P90X and body toning workouts (circuit training).  Personal fitness tests will be given throughout the semester, along with goal setting and collaboration among peers.  This class will expose students to a variety of exercises that can be used outside of a school setting, on a more individual and small group level to promote lifelong fitness.  For PE Credit.

PE Yoga/Dance (YODA)

251001 (10-12) This course is designed to introduce students, safely and accessibly, to the basic postures, breathing techniques, and relaxation methods of yoga and  meditation. Along with the health benefits and techniques of dance.  Units of instruction include: Foundations of Yoga, Dance, the elements of , movements, yoga postures, and breath work plus discovering the positives on meditation. s.  Intermediate skills of dance will focus on technique, poise, self-confidence, creativity, choreography, and productions.  For PE Credit.


SCIENCE

9th Grade Science 

932301 (9-10) This course centers on the study of the Earth Environment and the physical science concepts including: Earth’s place in the universe, dynamic Earth processes, energy within Earth’s system, climate, biogeochemical cycles of the earth, structure and composition of the atmosphere, and the geology of California. Lab activities will promote utilization of research and reporting, data collection and analysis, and understanding of earth and physical science concepts. Lab activities will promote utilization of the scientific process, research and reporting, data collection and analysis, and understanding of overarching biological concepts. The course content is designed to address the Next Generation Science Standards and each unit embeds both Cross-Cutting Concepts and Science and Engineering Practices. (G)

Prerequisite: none 

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Physical Science 

Biology

260302 (9-12) Biology is a first or second year college-prep lab science course. This course includes hands-on activities and laboratory investigations, and emphasizes academic and  collaborative skills, lab techniques, and science processes relevant to real world science understanding. NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) outlines topics covered and include fundamental principles of cellular biology, physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology using natural phenomena and exploratory learning. Students will learn how to formulate questions, evaluate claims, and develop models to make interpretations and investigate the natural world.  (D)

Prerequisite: Environmental Earth Science

8th Grade Prerequisite:  B in 8th Grade Science.

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Life Science 

Honors Biology

260304 (9-12) Honors Biology is an advanced first year college-prep lab science course. This course includes hands-on activities and laboratory investigations, and emphasizes reading, writing, research, organizational skills, lab techniques, and science process skills relevant to real world science applications. NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) outlines topics covered and include fundamental principles of chemistry, cells, physiology, genetics, evolution, and ecology using natural phenomena and problem solving exploratory learning. Concepts of earth systems are integrated to gain a more dynamic understanding of our living earth.  This course is designed to enhance critical thinking skills, allows for more depth of knowledge and opportunities for experimental and engineering design concepts.  Pacing for this class will be rapid, so excellent attendance, organization and reading, writing and listening skills are necessary for this advanced course.Perfect for students seeking careers in science. (D)

Prerequisite: GPA of 3.0+

Recommended Completion of Algebra I

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Life Science 

Physical Science 

261001 (10-12) The purpose of the Physical Science course is the systematic study of the physical world, as related to chemistry, physics, and space science. The topics studied in the course include the study of matter, energy, and waves, forces and motion, and the universe.  This course is ideal for students not quite ready for the math and skill requirements needed to access Chemistry or Physics and/or college bound students interested in a non-science major.  (D)

Prerequisite: Biology

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Physical science 

Chemistry 

260701 (10-12) Chemistry is a college-prep lab science course. This course will include hands-on activities and laboratory investigations, and will emphasize reading, organizational skills, problem-solving skills, lab techniques, and science process skills. Topics covered include fundamental principles of the structure and function of matter. Excellent attendance and reading skills are necessary for this course. (D) 

Highly Recommended:  Concurrent enrollment or completion of Algebra II  

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Physical Science 

Physics 

261302 (10-12) Physics is a second or third year college-prep lab science course. This course will include hands-on activities and laboratory investigations, and will emphasize reading, organizational skills, problem-solving skills, lab techniques and science process skills. Topics include fundamental principles of mechanics, waves, optics, electromagnetism, nuclear physics and heat. Excellent attendance and reading skills are necessary for this course. (D) 

Prerequisite: Biology and Algebra II with a C or better

Highly commended:Concurrent enrollment or completion of Trigonometry

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Physical science 

SCIENCE

AP Physics 

261301 (11-12) This course is organized to bring together the fundamental science principles and theories of general physics. The course is intended to encourage students to think about physics concepts as interconnected pieces of a puzzle. The solution to the puzzle is how the real world around them actually works. Students designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college course in physics. Students must be motivated, self-starter, a critical thinker, an avid reader, a problem-solver, have excellent writing skills, and good attendance. 

College Board offers 4 different levels of AP level Physics Exams.   The course is designed to prepare students to take AP Physics C Mechanics, in turn also preparing them for AP Physics 1.  AP Physics C Mechanics exam is calculus based and requires high computational skill along with analytical skill.  AP Physics 1 exam is algebra based and is rigorous in fundamental physics concepts and requires high ordered analytical skill and language skill. 

Students who are planning to major in physics or engineering, should focus on AP PHYSICS C Mechanics.

Math Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus.

Science Prerequisite: Completion of Biology & Chemistry with B or better OR Physics with a C or better.

AP Environmental Science 

267401 (11-12) This course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The goal of the APES course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and preventing them. Student must be motivated, self-starter, a critical thinker, an avid reader, a problem-solver, have excellent writing skills, and good attendance. (D) 

Prerequisite: C or better in Biology & Chemistry/Physical Science

CTE SCIENCE OPTIONS

ANIMAL SCIENCE PATHWAY

Intro to Agriculture 

(Pathway Course 1) 710001 (9-10) This course is designed to meet the needs of the first year agriculture student. Students will acquire a broad understanding of modern agriculture and develop an awareness and appreciation for the myriad of career related opportunities in agriculture. Students will experience the opportunity to work cooperatively within groups, as well as develop and expand leadership abilities. The major portions of the course include the following: California Agriculture, Leadership, Plant Science, and Animal Science. Participation in FFA activities and a Supervised Agricultural Experience Project (SAEP) are important parts of the class and will be part of the student’s grade. 

Prerequisite: none 

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Life or Physical Science 

Next Course in Pathway: 

Veterinary Practices (elective credit)

SUSTAINABLE AG SCIENCE PATHWAY

Sustainable Agriculture Practices

(Pathway Course 1) 713301 (9-12) Sustainable Agriculture is a one-year lab course designed to integrate biological science practices and knowledge into the practice of sustainable agriculture. The course is organized into four major sections, or units, each with a guiding question. Unit one addresses the question, what is sustainable agriculture? Unit two, how does sustainable agriculture fit into our environment? Unit three, what molecular biology principles guide sustainable agriculture? Unit four, How do we make decisions to maximize sustainable agricultural practices within a functioning ecosystem? Within each unit specific life science principles will be identified with agricultural principles and practices guiding the acquisition of this knowledge, culminating in the development of a sustainable farm model and portfolio of supporting student research. (D) NCAA 

Prerequisite: none

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Life Science 

Next Course in Pathway: Soil Chemistry

Agriculture and Soil Chemistry

(Pathway Course 2) 713501 (10-12) This lab course explores the physical and chemical nature of soil as well as the relationships between soil, plants, animals and agricultural practices. Students will examine properties of soil and land and their connections to plant and animal production. Using knowledge of scientific protocols as well as course content, students will develop an Agriscience research program to be conducted throughout the first semester of the course. (D) 

Prerequisite: Sustainable Ag with a C or better, and completion of Algebra I 

Graduation Requirement Satisfied: Physical Science 



CTE SCIENCE OPTIONS

Advanced Sustainable Ag Honors

(Sustainable Ag Pathway Course 3) 713503 (11-12) This integrated course combines an interdisciplinary approach to laboratory science and research with agricultural management principles.  Using skills and principles learned in this course, students design systems and experiments to solve agricultural management issues currently facing the industry.  Additionally, students will connect the products created in this class with industry activities to link real world encounters and implement skills demanded by both colleges and careers.  This course culminates with an agriscience experimental research project in which students design and conduct an experiment to solve a relevant issue.  Final projects will be eligible for Career Development Event competition in FFA events.  Throughout the course, students will be graded on participation in intracurricular FFA activities as well as development and maintenance of an ongoing supervised agricultural experience (SAE) program. (G)

Prerequisite: C or better in Ag Soil Chem

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Introduction to World History

271202 (10) This non college-prep course meets the World History graduation requirement and is for sophomores who have reading and writing skills needs. Students study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late sixteenth century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars.  The course follows the same timeline and concepts as World History, but with modified pacing and with learning activities designed to help students with analytical and communication skills.

Placement: By Reading Specialist and teacher recommendation

World History, Culture, and Geography: The Modern World

271204 (10) Required in a student’s sophomore year to meet graduation and college entrance requirements.  Students study major turning points that shaped the modern world, from the late sixteenth century through the present, including the cause and course of the two world wars.  They trace the rise of democratic ideas and develop an understanding of the historical roots of current world issues, especially as they pertain to international relations.  Students develop an understanding of current world issues and relate them to their historical, geographic, political, economic, and cultural contexts.  Students consider multiple accounts of events in order to understand international relations from a variety of perspectives. (A)

AP European History

277401 (10) AP European History is a college level course, designed to prepare high school students for the AP European History test.  Although the class is a European History class it fulfills the California standards for World Cultures, History, and Geography, which are predominantly based in European History.  The class will cover European History from approximately 1450 (the high Renaissance) to the present.  The class will introduce students to cultural, economic, political, and social elements that played a fundamental role in shaping today’s world.  The class will provide students a narrative of events and movements throughout the above-stated time period, an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European History, an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation through primary documents, and an ability to express historical understanding in writing.  (A)

Prerequisite: English with a C or better and English teacher’s recommendation.

Introduction to U.S. History

270903 (11) This non college-prep course meets the US History graduation requirement and is for juniors who have reading and writing skills needs.  Topics studied include:  American Wars (Revolutionary and Civil War, World Wars I and II, Korean and Vietnam Wars); socioeconomic trends of the past and their effects on American society today, including causes and consequences of the inflation of the 20’s, the Great Depression of the 30’s, and the social changes that have taken place in the 20th century.

Placement: By Reading Specialist and teacher recommendation

  1. S. History

270907 (11) Offered in the junior year to meet graduation and college entrance requirements.  Several historical topics will be studied, evaluated and discussed, including American Revolution, Civil War, World Wars I and II, Korean and Vietnam Wars, and socioeconomic trends of the past and their effects on American society today, including causes and consequences of the inflation of the 20’s, the Depression of the 30’s, and the social changes that have taken place in the 20th century.  (A)

AP U.S. History

277501 (11) This course fulfills and exceeds the U.S. History requirement for college entrance. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to increase their listening, speed reading, research, writing, oral and creative expression skills by participation in lectures, media productions, small and large-group discussions, and in individual study projects.  Students completing this course are prepared to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History Examination.  (A)

Placement: open

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Introduction to American Institutions

279802 (12) This non college-prep course meets the American Institution graduation requirement and is for seniors who have reading and writing skills needs.  Introduction to American Institutions is a course designed for seniors who have difficulty reading at the high school level. Its basic course contents are the same as American Institutions. The course includes a semester in Civics, and a semester of Economics. 

Placement: By Reading Specialist and teacher recommendation

American Institutions

270308 (12) This course is a two-semester course for seniors.  One semester will deal with the background and development of the American political system and how it works today.  This semester’s goal is to help each student become a knowledgeable and functioning member of our political society.  The second semester is an introductory economics course covering fundamental concepts such as scarcity, opportunity costs, supply/demand, fiscal and monetary policy, and investment in equities.   (A)

AP Comparative Government

277201 (12) This AP course in Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to student’s importance of global political and economic changes. Comparison assists both in identifying problems and in analyzing policy-making. The course is based on the study of six countries: Great Britain, China, Russia, Mexico, Nigeria and Iran. During this semester students will develop a better understanding of these countries and by comparing these six countries to the United States, develop a more thorough understanding of their own country.  (A)

Placement: open

SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES

Geography

271205 (9) This is a course designed to help students relate distant places and cultures to their own lives.  Each unit addresses physical geography, human geography, and major issues of a specific region of the world.  Students will learn how to make comparisons between physical and human geography by exploring the similarities and differences across cultures. This course does not meet the Social Studies requirement.  It is a college prep elective. (G)

Psychology

271401 (10-12) The purpose of the course in Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Students are exposed to the psychological facts. Principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology.  They also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  (G)

Prerequisite: C or better in English

AP Psychology

277601 (11-12) Advanced Placement Psychology is a rigorous, college-level course that provides students with an introduction to the diverse perspectives within the field of psychology.  In preparation for the AP Exam, the course will explore influences on human and animal behavior ranging from environment to genetics.  Students will also be exposed to a broad range of psychological disorders and the methods psychologists use in their treatment.  The course will require nightly textbook reading and notetaking, supplemental reading, interactive class lectures, participation in class activities, presentations, small outside experiments, and frequent essay writing.  Students electing to take this course should be self-driven and prepared for an intellectual challenge.

Placement: 11-12, B or better in English and History and demonstration of strong work-ethic.  Any exception to the criteria must come with both a teacher and counselor recommendation and conference with the instructor.


NON-DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES

Campus Culture

428009 (10-12) This course has a focused goal to help facilitate student-led projects that better the culture and climate of the campus.  The inspiration of this course came from past senior projects that were powerful and had the potential to be really influential for the entire student body given more time and resources.  The students in this class will work in collaboration with students in Leadership, FFA, and MESA to help develop and execute school wide projects.  Campus culture is perfect for students interested in creating a positive change and taking action, interested in leadership skills and have a willingness and desire to collaborate, not afraid to be introspective and vulnerable, have an entrepreneur spirit, a willingness to think outside the box, and an interest in design thinking.

Prerequisite: Teacher approved signature

Student Leadership

271901 (10-12).  An activity-based course designed for any interested student but specifically for elected student leaders.  The primary goal will be to develop organizational and leadership skills, including improvement of written and oral communication in order to facilitate interpersonal relationships with peers and adults and to maintain the involvement in student and community affairs.  Students are required to complete 60 hours each of community service per term outside of class time.  Students may be also required to complete projects that range from research papers (1,500-2,000 words) to a personal budget/career planning assignment.  Lastly, students will be asked to attend retreats and training outside of school time.  Learn more about leadership here.

Placement: Based on application essay and interview only.  Contract must be signed by student and parent.

CP Yearbook 

282102 (10-12) This course will challenge your creativity and business sense while you learn to design and produce a first-class product your peers want to buy to keep forever: the UHS Yearbook!  Action photography and in-class assignments and then creating compelling layouts is the goal.  The business of publishing also takes a look at funding and sales of the product.  Requires enthusiasm, school spirit, a talent with words and images, and a desire to work as a team. (G)

Prerequisite: Teacher Approval

Completion of Journalism or Beginning Photography are desirable.  

Sports Elective

251203 (10-12) Students can earn a semester of elective credit (this credit does not meet the state requirement of two years of physical education for graduation) for successful completion of a sport season.  Each sport will be valued at five units.  Students may earn a maximum of 10 credits per year.

Work Experience

490014 (11-12) General Work Experience enables a student 16 years or older to earn elective high school credit for having taxable paid employment.  Students are graded on a combination of weekly-related online assignments, weekly time cards and a job performance evaluation by the student’s supervisor.  A student may earn one credit for every thirty-six hours of work verified up to a maximum of ten credits per semester.  Students are required to turn in a google form once per week along with turning in an assignment through Google Classroom, thus allowing more time to work, do homework or participate in extracurricular activities.  This class may NOT be added after the first three weeks of each semester.

*Teacher Assistant 

No Educational Content Course

440110 (11-12) A student may work as an assistant for credit.  Duties would primarily be clerical.  A student may earn no more than 10 credits per year (5 credits per semester).  

Placement: Supervising Teacher approval

*Instructional Assistant

No Educational Content Course

440112 (11-12). A student may work as a teaching aide as long as they have previously taken the course and demonstrated a level of mastery in the subject. 

Prerequisite: Previous coursework related to subject matter

Placement: Supervising Teacher approval

*Office Assistant


NON-DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES

No Educational Content Course

440102-440109 (11-12) A student may work in an office for credit.  A student may earn no more than 10 credits per year (5 credits per semester).  Unit stipulations are the same as those for Teacher Assistant.  An office assistant must be responsible, trustworthy, and maintain confidentiality.  All students must sign a contract agreeing to these conditions.  A violation will result in a drop F for the semester.

Placement: A Building approval

*Community Service

No Educational Content Course

609832 (11-12) This is a volunteer non-paid position in which a student finds a placement with a local school, non-profit or governmental agency in the community.  The student gains experience, works with adults and learns about careers.  Students must complete a minimum of 12 hours to earn credit for this course with a maximum of 60 hours and 5 credits per semester.  9th and 10th graders can add this course outside of their 6 period day.


*A MAXIMUM of only 30 credits in Teacher Assistant, Instructional Assistant, Office Assistant, or Community Service may be applied toward graduation.  No 9th or 10th grade students may take office assistant/teacher assistant.  All students who intend to take a “No Educational Content” course during the school day MUST meet eligibility requirements including being on track with A-G or CTE completion AND must have at least 95% attendance in their previous semester of school.  They also must maintain this semester to semester.


SPECIAL COURSES

Bridge Courses

Bridge Courses are designed for students with Individualized Educational Plans that require specialized instruction to meet Certification of Completion requirements.  These courses focus on life skills related to both academic and social growth. Bridge courses can also be combined with general education courses and/or Supported Education courses.  Courses include: SE Bridge English, SE Bridge Math, and SE Workability. 

Learning Center Courses

Learning Center, or LC courses are designed for students with Individualized Educational Plans that require specialized instruction outside of the general education setting.  These courses are designed for students reading and/or performing significantly below grade level who need a smaller classroom environment and additional support to meet their goals.  Courses include: LC English I, II, LC Jr/Sr English, LC Algebra Essentials, LC Math Foundations, LC Science, LC Resource, Work Readiness and Workability.

Supported Education

Supported Education classes enable students with moderate to severe disabilities to receive a high school education.  These classes are designed to help with practical life skills as well as strengthening educational skills.  The student’s individual skills are considered as course curriculum and lesson plans are designed.  Courses include: SE Language Arts, SE Math for Life, SE Food Science, SE Community Skills, SE Art, SE Health Education, and Modified PE.

Young Parent

The Young Parent Program is designed to support pregnant and parenting students continuing their education while dealing with the responsibilities of raising a child.  The program offers a wide range of academic courses including parenting, child development, and required academics and provides child care services.  Ukiah Unified School District runs the program through South Valley High School.